Photo: Thomas Aurin of Rüping's 'Hamlet'

Why do theatre directors work with canonical dramatic texts?: Lars Maagerø on Rüping's 2017 Hamlet

The most striking moment in the production was the ‘To be or not to be’-soliloquy, which was removed from its dramatic context in the third act and given as the culmination of the performance. The soliloquy was staged not as Hamlet’s private contemplation of suicide, but three actors in the production delivered the speech simultaneously and directed it outwards, towards the audience.

‘Why the current surge in Live Action Role Play?’ Lucy Jolin interviews Clare Foster for CAM magazine

Lucy Jolin interviewed Re- Network founder Clare Foster about the popularity of social forms of re-enactment for the latest issue of CAM magazine. CRASSH reports on it here. “Emily Zhang is loitering with intent in Grantchester Meadows. She is on a mission: to overthrow a mysterious artificial intelligence that has been terrifying her people. Eventually, […]

Why Thinking about the Tacit is Key in a Digital Age: by Satinder Gill

What do we mean when we say ‘we can’t see the wood for the trees’? The expression marks the fact there are always different levels of potential awareness when we look at what is in front of us. For Polanyi, who coined the expression ‘tacit knowing’ or ‘tacit knowledge’ in his seminal work ‘The Tacit Dimension’ (1966), these multiple levels are a form of tacit knowing, a comprehensive entity. Knowledge for Polanyi is above all personal: an embodied act, and always mediated.

Little Magazines: Producing and Re-producing Avant-Garde Communities – Sophie Seita on her new book

Author Sophie Seita discusses her new book Provisional Avant-Gardes: Little Magazine Communities from Dada to Digital, Stanford University Press, 2019 For a long time now I’ve been fascinated by ‘little magazines’; that is, magazines that generally have a small budget, a small print-run, a short-ish life span, and a small audience due to their publication […]

‘The first time as performance, the second time as art’

Mischa Twitchin’s essay films engage with philosophical ideas through a carefully calibrated and playful combination of sound, pace, image, duration and text.

This essay-film performs the paradoxical simultaneities it addresses. As film-philosophy, its meaning depends on being watched several times. Or as Twitchin  puts it, ‘we have to practice Brechtian watching of the other watchers’.