‘Re-/Un-working Tragedy: Perspectives from the Global South’: Ekin Bodur on her upcoming Re- Network conference

But how does recognisable repetition operate as a unique kind of site for invention, and for speech? And how might we see a Global South engagement with the tragic canon as a de-stabilizing gesture – an un-working, rather than a re-working?

‘Why the current surge in Live Action Role Play?’ Lucy Jolin interviews Clare Foster for CAM magazine

Lucy Jolin interviewed Re- Network founder Clare Foster about the popularity of social forms of re-enactment for the latest issue of CAM magazine. CRASSH reports on it here. “Emily Zhang is loitering with intent in Grantchester Meadows. She is on a mission: to overthrow a mysterious artificial intelligence that has been terrifying her people. Eventually, […]

Beowulf: a multi-lingual translation-as-performance?

What insights about the idea of ‘translation’ might be gleaned from thinking about it not only in performance, but itself as a kind of performance? Nicholas Arnold, following last week’s ‘Re-’ Interdisciplinary Network symposium on ‘Translation as Performance’[1], was prompted to reflect on the multicultural and multilingual shows and audiences that have characterized international theatre festivals since the 1960s – including his own productions.

Can ‘Hamlet’ be an Arab?

Her work, in her own words, is ‘to see Hamlet splinter and be reconstituted; serve as a mask, a megaphone, and a measuring stick; and tell a story as revealing of his host’s identities as his own’[1]. She explores the presence of ‘Hamlet’ in Arab contexts – as both a play and a character – in various forms, shapes and images, with the last chapter of her book examining six Arab Hamlet off-shoots staged between 1976-2004. The common denominator of these productions is how they reveal the political and social consciousness of the theatremakers staging the various productions.

‘L’Histoire du Soldat’: Re-imagining Stravinsky’s score in the age of technological weapons.

100 years after the end of World War I (and 100 years after L’Histoire du Soldat was first performed), I adapt the classic story to focus on the technology of modern warfare: drones. In conversation with the original, my piece integrates the striking Stravinsky score with the urgency of a new story, allowing us to interrogate the ongoing nature of war and manipulation.