‘Re-Enacting Icons: Self-Portraiture and Selfies’: Prof. Gabriella Giannachi on her current research at the University of Exeter

Lynn Hershman Leeson, Roberta Breitmore, 1974-1978. External Transformations: Roberta’s Construction Chart, No. 1, Dye transfer print, 40″ x 30″, 1975. Courtesy of the artist. How has the rendering of the concept of the ‘self’ in art changed from the early 1400s to the digital present? To explore self-representation in self-portraiture, a number of paintings, photographs, […]

‘Re-/Un-working Tragedy: Perspectives from the Global South’: Ekin Bodur on her upcoming Re- Network conference

But how does recognisable repetition operate as a unique kind of site for invention, and for speech? And how might we see a Global South engagement with the tragic canon as a de-stabilizing gesture – an un-working, rather than a re-working?

The Task Ahead: Salvatore Settis and the ‘Classical’.

Asked by an academic friend to name one book I would save if the world were to collapse in an apocalyptic climate change scenario, I thought: ‘it’s too hard’, but then started going though my mental library. ‘You wouldn’t want to save an academic book, would you,’ said my friend, ‘surely a novel, an artist’s book…’. But in those few seconds I had already settled in my head for Salvatore Settis’ The Future of the ‘Classical’ (Polity, 2006, translated by Allan Cameron). Why?

Can ‘Hamlet’ be an Arab?

Her work, in her own words, is ‘to see Hamlet splinter and be reconstituted; serve as a mask, a megaphone, and a measuring stick; and tell a story as revealing of his host’s identities as his own’[1]. She explores the presence of ‘Hamlet’ in Arab contexts – as both a play and a character – in various forms, shapes and images, with the last chapter of her book examining six Arab Hamlet off-shoots staged between 1976-2004. The common denominator of these productions is how they reveal the political and social consciousness of the theatremakers staging the various productions.