‘Re-/Un-working Tragedy: Perspectives from the Global South’: Ekin Bodur on her upcoming Re- Network conference

But how does recognisable repetition operate as a unique kind of site for invention, and for speech? And how might we see a Global South engagement with the tragic canon as a de-stabilizing gesture – an un-working, rather than a re-working?

Can ‘Hamlet’ be an Arab?

Her work, in her own words, is ‘to see Hamlet splinter and be reconstituted; serve as a mask, a megaphone, and a measuring stick; and tell a story as revealing of his host’s identities as his own’[1]. She explores the presence of ‘Hamlet’ in Arab contexts – as both a play and a character – in various forms, shapes and images, with the last chapter of her book examining six Arab Hamlet off-shoots staged between 1976-2004. The common denominator of these productions is how they reveal the political and social consciousness of the theatremakers staging the various productions.